Center for Compressive Sensing Center for Compressive Sensing

Home

Outreach

Publications

Principal Investigators

Students

Tutorials

 

Principal Investigators

Michael Flynn

Michael Flynn
Dr. Flynn joined the University of Michigan in 2001, and is currently an Associate Professor. His technical interests are in data conversion, gigabit serial transceivers, and RF circuits. Michael P. Flynn was born in Cork, Ireland. He received the Ph.D. degree from Carnegie Mellon University in 1995. From 1998 to 1991, he was with the National Microelectronics Research Centre, Cork. He was with National Semiconductor in Santa Clara, CA, from 1993 to 1995. From 1995 to 1997 he was a Member of Technical Staff at Texas Instruments, DSP R&D lab, Dallas, TX. From 1997 to 2001, he was with Parthus Technologies, Cork. Michael Flynn is a 2008 Guggenheim Fellow. He received the 2005-2006 Outstanding Achievement Award from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He received the NSF Early Career Award in 2004. He received the 1992-93 IEEE Solid-State Circuits Pre-doctoral Fellowship. He is an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits (JSSC) and serves on the Technical Program Committees of the International Solid State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He was Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II from 2002 to 2004. He is Thrust Leader responsible for Wireless Interfaces at Michigan's Wireless Integrated Microsystems NSF Engineering Research Center.

Anna Gilbert

Anna Gilbert
I have an S.B. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. from Princeton University, both in mathematics. In 1997, I was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University and AT&T Labs-Research. From 1998 to 2004, I was a member of technical staff at AT&T Labs-Research in Florham Park, NJ. My research interests include analysis, probability, networking, and algorithms. I am especially interested in randomized algorithms with applications to harmonic analysis, signal and image processing, networking, and massive datasets.

Mingyan Liu

Mingyan Liu
I came to Ann Arbor, Michigan in August 2000. Prior to that I was a graduate student at the ECE Department , the Institute for Systems Research , and the Center for Satellite and Hybrid Communication Networks at the University of Maryland, College Park. Currently I am an associate professor with the EECS Department, University Michigan. I am also an affiliate member of the Center for Wireless Communications Research and the NSF Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS) ERC. My research focuses on performance analysis and building energy-efficient/high-performance networking mechanisms for wireless sensor networks, mobile wireless ad hoc networks, and broadband satellite networks. I am also interested in optimal resource allocation as well as network modeling and simulation techniques for such networks.

Jerome Lynch

Jerome Lynch
Jerome P. Lynch (M'04) received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil and environmental engi- neering, in 1998 and 2002, respectively, and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering, in 2003, from Stanford University, Stanford. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan; he is also an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. His research interests include wireless structural monitoring, feedback control, and damage detection algorithms. Some of his more current research has been focused on the design of nanoengineered materials for smart structure applications including carbon nanotube-based thin-film wireless sensors for structural health monitoring. Dr. Lynch was awarded the 2005 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the 2007 University of Michigan Henry Russel Award, and the 2008 College of Engineering (University of Michigan) 1938E Award.

Wayne Stark

Wayne Stark
Wayne Stark received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1982. Since then he has been at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Communications from 1985-1989. He received a national Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, was a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Information Theory Society from 1986-1988., and became an IEEE Fellow in 1998.

David Wentzloff David Wentzloff
David D. Wentzloff received the B.S.E. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1999, and the S.M. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, in 2002 and 2007, respectively. In the summer of 2004, he worked in the Portland Technology Development group at Intel in Hillsboro, OR. Since August, 2007 he has been with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is the recipient of the 2002 MIT Masterworks award, and the 2004 Analog Devices Distinguished Scholar award, and the 2009 DARPA Young Faculty Award. He has served on the technical program committee for ICUWB 2008-2010. He is a member of IEEE, IEEE Circuits and Systems Society, IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society, and Tau Beta Pi.
   
  Copyright © 2010 Center for Compressive Sensing
University of Michigan College of Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Science